28 5 / 2013

28 5 / 2013

01 3 / 2013

nypl:

Lend me your ear and look at what’s here! It’s the NYPL’s first ever National Poetry Contest on Twitter! To enter, register and agree to the contest rules, follow @NYPL on Twitter, and submit three poetic Tweets in English as public posts on your Twitter stream between March 1 and 10, 2013. Three poetic Tweets constitute one entry and each poem must contain the @NYPL Twitter handle. Two of the poems can cover any topic you choose, but at least one of the three poems needs to be about libraries, books, reading, or New York City. All entries must be original, unpublished, and must not have won any award. Entrants may submit one entry per day.  You can read about the prizes, rules and regulations here. 

You know what?  I think this is awesome.

nypl:

Lend me your ear and look at what’s here! It’s the NYPL’s first ever National Poetry Contest on TwitterTo enter, register and agree to the contest rules, follow @NYPL on Twitter, and submit three poetic Tweets in English as public posts on your Twitter stream between March 1 and 10, 2013. Three poetic Tweets constitute one entry and each poem must contain the @NYPL Twitter handle. Two of the poems can cover any topic you choose, but at least one of the three poems needs to be about libraries, books, reading, or New York City. All entries must be original, unpublished, and must not have won any award. Entrants may submit one entry per day.  You can read about the prizes, rules and regulations here

You know what?  I think this is awesome.

28 1 / 2013

"When I taught fiction, as I did for a few years, I told my students, ‘When you read Pride and Prejudice, if you’re a woman, don’t identify with Elizabeth Bennet, and if you’re a man, don’t identify with Fitzwilliam Darcy. In both cases, identify with Jane Austen. Identify with the author, not the character, think ‘what’s the author trying to do?’"

For the 200th birthday of Pride and Prejudice today, some wise words from Martin Amis. Complement with Nabokov on how to be a good reader.  (via explore-blog)

(Source: , via teachingliteracy)

23 1 / 2013

27 12 / 2012

I read The Hobbit yesterday.  As in, the entire thing.  With a boyfriend who is as certifiably obsessed with The Lord of the Rings as mine is, it’s no small wonder that I saw the movie the week it came out.  I’ve seen all the LOTR movies actually, but mostly in bits and pieces and no real order.  Because of this, it has never truly motivated me to read the books because I still, despite having seen it countless times, have no idea what’s going on. (I should probably just sit down and watch them all in full and in proper order).

Anyway, I very much enjoyed the film and it sparked in me a desire to read the books.  All of them.  Right now!  I have off of work for the next week or so and cannot think of a better way to spend my days then curled up on the couch getting lost in Middle Earth. So yesterday I spent about seven hours following Bilbo and Thorin and Company on their adventure.  And it was fantastic.

I absolutely loved this book.  I really enjoyed the way that Tolkien acted as a story-teller, often addressing the reader directly, or making small side comments where appropriate.  There are a lot of characters and groups and relationships which I found a bit tricky to keep in line but as a whole I think those complexities add to the story and make it rich with an underlying history (something I have been told is even more apparent in the trilogy).  All in all it was a great, fantastical story and I am very, very much looking forward to starting the Lord of the Rings trilogy now.

19 12 / 2012

Questions to ask your interviewers at Attempting Elegance

This is a really helpful article about the types of questions you might ask your interviewer when being interviewed for a library position. I am always nervous and quiet at interviews regardless of the fact that my personality is, generally, not like that at all.  I’m usually too shy to ask a question if I have one or, more likely, just can’t think of anything I want to know at the time.  These are really good suggestions though and I’ll definitely be using them next time!

18 12 / 2012

16 12 / 2012

teachingliteracy:

paigealexis:
For my last uni project we had to pick a book from the Penguin Classics range a design a cover for it.

teachingliteracy:

paigealexis:

For my last uni project we had to pick a book from the Penguin Classics range a design a cover for it.

16 12 / 2012

nypl:

“I cannot imagine the type of sinister fiend who would be against the library. A library essentially says, ‘Look, here is some free information that will enrich your life. Read it on your own time. I trust that you will bring it back when you are finished.’ It might be the most civilized, forward-thinking institution in America. Perhaps the only one, in fact.”

— Chuck Klosterman

nypl:

“I cannot imagine the type of sinister fiend who would be against the library. A library essentially says, ‘Look, here is some free information that will enrich your life. Read it on your own time. I trust that you will bring it back when you are finished.’ It might be the most civilized, forward-thinking institution in America. Perhaps the only one, in fact.”


— Chuck Klosterman